Women

 

Behold, children are a gift from the LORD, the fruit of the womb a reward. Like arrows in the hand of a warrior are the children of one’s youth. Blessed is the man who fills his quiver with them! He shall not be put to shame when he speaks with his enemies in the gate. (Psalm 127:3-5)

How amazing it is to hold your own newborn child. This little miracle of life enters the world small, vulnerable and completely dependent. I was entranced each time one of our children were born. They won my heart immediately and permanently. And from that first breath onward God begins to unfold life to the fullest. Truly, boys and girls are a gift from the Lord.

WomenBut it is not a surprise to anyone that in many countries around the world girls are not valued the same as boys. Take China for instance, where until recently it was against the law to have more than one child. The preference for sons has had a disturbing impact on the country’s population. Thankfully, the one child policy was recently revoked. But for several decades the ratio of men to women has been skewed. In China today there are 120 boys born for every 100 girls. There will not be enough brides for one fifth of the boys being born today when they are ready to marry.

In many parts of the world it is normal for a pregnant woman to be blessed by others with a prayer for a boy. A boy has better earning power over his lifetime. A boy carries the family name forward. So cultural pressure on families for having boys in many of these nations is overwhelming. In both China and India ultrasound was used to determine the sex of the unborn child. If it was a girl, it was often aborted. China finally made it illegal to use technology to determine the sex of the child before birth. However, the practice continues in India and in other parts of the world.

In India, poor families will make a decision to send a son to school while the daughter remains uneducated. She will begin a life of labor as early as the age of 10 (which is why my church invests in a school there to educate poor minority girls Bright Hope English School). And in many Muslim countries women are treated as second-class citizens. Simply put, a majority of women enter this world without even a notion to dream of a different future.

The empowerment of women in the West has brought amazing vitality to our nations. Educated and capable women make contributions at every level of our society. But culture shifts are hard. It was hard in the west. A century ago in America it required a long struggle before the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified (on August 18, 1920). When they first tried to pass it they had plenty of advocates in the Republican and Progressive parties. But the Democratic Party and the President were powerful adversaries. Both used their power to defeat it when it was first presented in 1915. Beth Behn[1] writes about how it was finally passed in the House with President Wilson’s support…

“The National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA)… was decisive in Wilson’s conversion to the cause of the federal amendment because its approach mirrored his own conservative vision of the appropriate method of reform: win a broad consensus, develop a legitimate rationale, and make the issue politically valuable.”

Cultural challenges existed in America. Reasoned arguments were offered on both sides. There were Christians who argued for and against the amendment on biblical grounds. One of the biggest contributors to a change in the heart of America was the contribution made by women during World War I. There was a broad recognition of sacrifices made by women and their role in the winning of the war. As Behn says, they won broad consensus, developed a legitimate rationale, and made the issue politically valuable. The NAWSA persisted. Justice is not always as immediate as its advocates want. But in America, a nation where equality is one of the highest ideals, justice was inevitable.

In The Crucified God Confronts Gendercide Dr. Paul Metzger says,

“The Lutheran Bonhoeffer… argued that Jesus is the man for others and the church is the community for others. Special consideration is given to those others who suffer genocide like the Jews or gendercide like so many women and girls across the globe. May we, the church, not stand aloof as we hear the cry of the victims of violence and sexual abuse (domestic abuse included). If we do, we fail to listen to Jesus’ call. Rather, may we enter their nightmare with the hope-filled advocacy grounded in faith in the all-powerful, gracious and costly love of the crucified and risen Jesus. Our Jesus is their victor.”

As long as there are women in this world who remain marginalized, we have a responsibility to actively pursue and value them. We may be hindered by culture, law and opposition, but we need to be persistent. It is the Christlike thing to do.

We are standing on the shoulders of giants. Those who have gone before us have sought and won justice. They changed the argument, won broad consensus and affected laws. Can we do any less with the freedoms and blessings bestowed upon us in Christ?

 

 

[1] Behn, Beth, “Woodrow Wilson’s conversion experience: The president and the federal woman suffrage amendment.” (PhD dissertation, U. of Massachusetts-Amherst, 2012)

 

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About marknicklas

Mark Nicklas is a husband, father, son and follower of Jesus Christ. He is a pastor at Beaverton Foursquare Church and an adjunct professor at Multnomah University. He is currently studying for his doctorate in Cultural Engagement. Like Jacob wrestled with God at Jabbok, this site is a place for talking about the identity of the church with respect to the cultures we live in. You are invited to share the journey.
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